Ethiopia Rising

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Since Abiy Ahmed has been nominated as a new Prime Minister, Ethiopia is living an extraordinary time of enthusiasm and hope. The country is experiencing a strong democratization process, including a gender revolution in power: Sahle Work Zewde is the new President – the first in Africa, after Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in Liberia – while half of the new ministers are women. The peace agreement signed with Eritrea made Abiy a new global icon and Ethiopia the country of Hope. Now the greatest challenge is the economy: to transform a country in which 80% of people work in agriculture in the new global manufacturing hub.

 

The new railway at Atekilit Tera, main fruit and vegetable marketSalt caravan proceeding along the Danakil regionPeasants working on teff, the tipical ceral of the Ethiopian highlandHarar meat market. Islam arrived in Eastern Ethiopia in the 7th CenturyMeskel square, main Addis Ababa squareNew Bole road in Addis AbabaSher greenhouses in Ziway, 160 km South of Addis Ababa in the Rift Valley. The Dutch company is leader of the industrial floricolture. Sher workers in Ziway earn less than 30 euros per monthNew condominiums under construction at Arat Kilo district, Addis Ababa central areaErii Bekentu popular district cleared to make room for modern buildingThe new Addis Ababa light trainThe new Addis Ababa light trainAddis new suburb popular housesA mall during Christmas time in Addis AbabaMichael church in Addis AbabaAn informal settlment in Kazanchis district which will be cleared soon to make room for modern buildingPolo match at Jalmeda Park. Addis is the home of a great bourgeois awakeningZiway Lake, in the Rift Valley, 160 km south of Addis Ababa. Here the Duch company Sher leader of the industrial floricolture installed its first warehousesErii Bekentu popular district which has been cleared to make room for modern buildingEdele (cutter) making ganfur (salt slabs) under midday sun in the Danakil regionSher workers in Ziway. Cut flower industry in Ethiopia is dominated by Dutch foreign investorsPerforming at the First African Circus FestivalThe fairy-tale mountains on the border between the Ethiopian highland and the Danakil depressionNew Addis Ababa suburbBella popular district, one of the oldest neighbourhood in Addis AbabaPassengers on the new Addis Abeba light trainThe new Addis Ababa railwayDuring Timket, the most important Ethiopian Orthodox Church celebrationEthiopian film stars Messeret Meberate and Zinahbzu Tsegaye at a film premiere at the Sheraton Hotel in Addis AbabaInterview session for the EBS channel, a media based in Washington DC, the city in the world with the largest community of Ethiopians diasporaBackstage work during the Colors of the Nile International Film Festival. The development of the Ethiopian film industry over the past few years has created many job opportunities for the local youthAlemayehu Eshete performing at Selam music festival. During the Seventies he was called the Ethiopian Elvis PresleyDutch greenhouses in Hawassa, 220 km South of Addis Ababa in the Rift Valley. They produce mostly for Arab countries marketHortiflora Expo Ethiopia which is financed by Dutch development cooperationDutch greenhouses in Hawassa producing vegetables for exportPacking vegetables for exportVegetables ready for exportDutch greenhouses in Hawassa countrysideHortiflora Expo in Addis AbabaEthiopian former Minister of Industry meets a Dutch roses producer at the Hortiflora Expo in Addis AbabaDaily cleaning in Mesert’ family, Sher worker in Ziway

L’Etiopia vive un entusiasmo contagioso. La svolta democratica impressa dal nuovo primo ministro, Abiy Ahmed – revoca dello stato d’emergenza e repulisti delle forze armate, rilascio di migliaia di prigionieri politici e apertura ai gruppi d’opposizione, elezione della prima presidente donna e di un gabinetto dei ministri per metà femminile – e il suo impegno per la stabilizzazione dell’intero Corno d’Africa, come dimostra lo storico accordo di pace con l’Eritrea, hanno reso Abiy un’icona globale e l’Etiopia il Paese della speranza. Ora la sfida più grande è quella dell’economia: trasformare una nazione in cui l’80% dei lavoratori sono ancora impiegati in agricoltura nel nuovo hub dell’industria manifatturiera globale.

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